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Feb. 24 (Friday)

About Geobop

Geobopological Survey Headquarters
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Geobop is a nickname for Geobopological Survey, which is essentially a series of websites created by David Blomstrom, a Seattle-based naturalist, educator and political activist.

Geobop was originally established to market two self-published books that illustrate the variety of Blomstrom’s experiences, interests and ideas. (IR)Rational Parks is an irreverent look at America’s national parks through the eyes of naive tourists. Teacher With an Attitude was written as an attack on public education, which has sadly since been swallowed up by Corporate America.

Below are brief descriptions of Geobop’s five primary general audience websites.

Geobop

First there was Geobopological Survey, a jazz band in the beautiful city of Bellingham, Washington. Then there was David Blomstrom, a fan who appropriated the name. He created the website Geobop.com, which focused on a wild variety of topics, from facts about the 50 states to political reform.

The project was torpedoed by a combination of technical problems and political games. (A political activist, Blomstrom was among the first to criticize pResident George W. Bush and the phony war against terrorism, just as he now campaigns against Obama.)

After being hacked, Geobop.com was moved from a Microsoft server to a more secure Linux server. (Similarly, Geobop websites are now designed on a Mac, rather than a PC.) Geobop was split into several websites, with general audience sites headquartered at Geobop.org. Thus, Geobop.com was orphaned. But after several major upgrades, Geobop.com is back in action.

Geobop’s primary children are GeoWorld, GeoZoo, GeoSymbols and Politix. More than a billboard for these four websites, Geobop.com is now evolving into an increasingly useful website itself. Check out the new Geobop 50 States project.

GeoWorld

spinning globe

While GeoZoo, Geobop and Politix are relatively unique, GeoWorld faces some stiff competition. After all, websites that offer information on the world’s nations and the 50 states are a dime a dozen.

Thus, GeoWorld will probably never be #1 in its category. Nevertheless, it has carved out a lofty niche, aided in part by its association with the other Geobop websites. GeoWorld’s more unique features include Prehistoric America (in association with PaleoZoo).

PaleoZoo

PaleoZoo logo

Closely associated with both GeoWorld and GeoZoo, PaleoZoo focuses on prehistory and geology. If you want to know what Delaware’s state fossil is, or if you want to know why there are so few dinosaur fossils on the East Coast, this is a good place to begin your search.

GeoZoo

GeoZoo logo

David Blomstrom’s first love has always been animals, yet GeoZoo has been one of Geobop’s most neglected websites, largely because it’s such a daunting project. Merely classifying the more than 50,000 vertebrates is a formidable task.

GeoZoo was long little more than a taxonomic guide (primarily to vertebrates). However, several new features and more content have been added as the site slowly moves forward.

GeoZoo is associated with GeoWorld, which includes information on biogeography and ecoregions, and with GeoSymbols, which focuses largely on plants and animals that serve as national or state symbols.

GeoSymbols

whimsical Montana state flag

GeoSymbols was Geobop’s flagship website, even when it was just a subweb on the website Geobop.com. Today it is an independent website that once again gets more traffic than any other Geobop site.

This is partly because the webmaster is an authority on national and state symbols, especially “ecosymbols,” and partly because GeoSymbols covers its topic in such exhaustive detail, with a variety of special features.

Though GeoWorld and GeoZoo could eventually surpass it in popularity, GeoSymbols will likely remain Geobop’s flagship site.

Politix

Guy Faulk

Politix best lives up to Geobop’s motto: Nurturing fearless thinkers. There are a number of websites that offer information about government and “civics” for children. But the idea of introducing children to politics is regarded as practically heresy in many circles.

Politix pushes the envelope, exploring topics like conspiracy science, corruption, hate and name calling in politics. Thus, Politix will likely be the most controversial of Geobop’s general audience websites.

In fact, politics is like sex; if children don’t learn about it from a reputable and caring source, they’ll learn about it on the streets...or not at all. The consequences of political ignorance can be seen all around us (especially here in the U.S.).

Geobop is a nickname for Geobopological Survey, which is essentially a series of websites created by David Blomstrom, a Seattle-based naturalist, educator and political activist.

Geobop was originally established to market two self-published books that illustrate the variety of Blomstrom’s experiences, interests and ideas. (IR)Rational Parks is an irreverent look at America’s national parks through the eyes of naive tourists. Teacher With an Attitude was written as an attack on public education, which has sadly since been swallowed up by Corporate America.

Below are brief descriptions of Geobop’s five primary general audience websites.

Geobop

First there was Geobopological Survey, a jazz band in the beautiful city of Bellingham, Washington. Then there was David Blomstrom, a fan who appropriated the name. He created the website Geobop.com, which focused on a wild variety of topics, from facts about the 50 states to political reform.

The project was torpedoed by a combination of technical problems and political games. (A political activist, Blomstrom was among the first to criticize pResident George W. Bush and the phony war against terrorism, just as he now campaigns against Obama.)

After being hacked, Geobop.com was moved from a Microsoft server to a more secure Linux server. (Similarly, Geobop websites are now designed on a Mac, rather than a PC.) Geobop was split into several websites, with general audience sites headquartered at Geobop.org. Thus, Geobop.com was orphaned. But after several major upgrades, Geobop.com is back in action.

Geobop’s primary children are GeoWorld, GeoZoo, GeoSymbols and Politix. More than a billboard for these four websites, Geobop.com is now evolving into an increasingly useful website itself. Check out the new Geobop 50 States project.

GeoWorld

spinning globe

While GeoZoo, Geobop and Politix are relatively unique, GeoWorld faces some stiff competition. After all, websites that offer information on the world’s nations and the 50 states are a dime a dozen.

Thus, GeoWorld will probably never be #1 in its category. Nevertheless, it has carved out a lofty niche, aided in part by its association with the other Geobop websites. GeoWorld’s more unique features include Prehistoric America (in association with PaleoZoo).

PaleoZoo

PaleoZoo logo

Closely associated with both GeoWorld and GeoZoo, PaleoZoo focuses on prehistory and geology. If you want to know what Delaware’s state fossil is, or if you want to know why there are so few dinosaur fossils on the East Coast, this is a good place to begin your search.

GeoZoo

GeoZoo logo

David Blomstrom’s first love has always been animals, yet GeoZoo has been one of Geobop’s most neglected websites, largely because it’s such a daunting project. Merely classifying the more than 50,000 vertebrates is a formidable task.

GeoZoo was long little more than a taxonomic guide (primarily to vertebrates). However, several new features and more content have been added as the site slowly moves forward.

GeoZoo is associated with GeoWorld, which includes information on biogeography and ecoregions, and with GeoSymbols, which focuses largely on plants and animals that serve as national or state symbols.

GeoSymbols

whimsical Montana state flag

GeoSymbols was Geobop’s flagship website, even when it was just a subweb on the website Geobop.com. Today it is an independent website that once again gets more traffic than any other Geobop site.

This is partly because the webmaster is an authority on national and state symbols, especially “ecosymbols,” and partly because GeoSymbols covers its topic in such exhaustive detail, with a variety of special features.

Though GeoWorld and GeoZoo could eventually surpass it in popularity, GeoSymbols will likely remain Geobop’s flagship site.

Politix

Guy Faulk

Politix best lives up to Geobop’s motto: Nurturing fearless thinkers. There are a number of websites that offer information about government and “civics” for children. But the idea of introducing children to politics is regarded as practically heresy in many circles.

Politix pushes the envelope, exploring topics like conspiracy science, corruption, hate and name calling in politics. Thus, Politix will likely be the most controversial of Geobop’s general audience websites.

In fact, politics is like sex; if children don’t learn about it from a reputable and caring source, they’ll learn about it on the streets...or not at all. The consequences of political ignorance can be seen all around us (especially here in the U.S.).